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20120501
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 189 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: syrians shouted in anger and relief, anxious to tell their stories of the weekend's horrific massacre to u.n. observers and a television team. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we go inside the town of houla with alex thomson of "independent television news," the first journalist to report from there. >> brown: then, we turn to the 2012 presidential match-up on track to be the most expensive contest ever. >> woodruff: we examine the internet virus knownwns s he flame" that may y a ae to snsnch data and eaveveroroon computer users. >> brown: in the first of two reports, paul solman assesses the true cost of student-loan debt, now topping $1 trillion. >> reporter: beth hansen has just started making loan payments: $468 a month. will she ever pay off her loans? >> i may die first. so. in which case, they would need a copy of my death certificate to finally cancel my loan. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with dolores huerta, honored with the presidential medal of
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: europe's economic woes worsened today, causing renewed fears amid political disarray. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the crisis as european leaders ended their summit without agreement on concrete solutions. >> brown: plus, we ask how europe's instability could affect the u.s. especially as it deals th its own fiscal crisis. >> woodruff: then, paul solman asks an age-old question: will new technology make human workers obsolete? >> there are factorys where robots do almost all of the work. >> and lights out? why is it called lights out? >> because you don't need lighting in a place run by robots. >> brown: margaret warner looks at the case against the pakistani doctor jailed for 33 years after helping the c.i.a. capture osama bin laden. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a columbia univsity professor'sighto prove an innocent man was executed in texas. >> there was not a sled of forensic in evidence this case, even though the cr
's no more. so, of course, it's fearful. it's really uncertain situation. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown explores the merits of a liberal arts education with columbia university professor andrew delbanco, author of a new book called "college." >> the college classroom should be a place where students learn to speak with civility, to listen with respect to each other and, most of all, to realize that they might walk into the room in one point of view and they might walk out with another. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in here, the bright minds from inside and outside the company come together to work on an idea, adding to it from the road, improving it in the cloud, all in real time. >> good idea. >> it's the at&t network. providing new ways to work together, so business works better. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: social media giant facebook went public today with a high-profile ride on wall street. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the newshour tonight, we assess whether facebook and its management can live up to the hype surrounding today's stock offering. >> brown: then, ray suarez talks to u.s.a.i.d. administrator rajiv shah about a new public and private sector partnership to fight hunger in africa. >> warner: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: we have an update on the trayvon martin case after florida prosecutors release over 200 pages of photos and eyewitness accounts of the shooting of the unarmed teen. >> warner: and hari sreenivasan has a conversation with author and software developer clay johnson on managing the glut of information in this digital age. >> your clips have consequences, when you're reading an article on-line, you're not just reading that article, you're voting fors it, you're telling the editor to write more stuff like that. >> brown
's stalemate good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we look at the latest partisan divide over the debt ceiling and assess how the issue could play out in this year's campaign. >> woodruff: then, we examine the case against former bosnian general ratko mladic as he faces charges of genocide and ethnic cleansing at the u.n. court in the hague. >> brown: from our "american graduate" series, ray suarez has the story of an eighth grader who turns to journalism to tackle violence in his middle school. >> if i didn't have a camera i would probably be led up with the wrong people and doing the wrong stuff and i wouldn't >> woodruff: margaret warner explores the dramatic results of a new study showing paralyzed patients moving their robotic arms just by thinking. >> brown: we update the trial of john edwards, as the defense rests its case without calling the former presidential candidate or his mistress to testify. >> woodruff: and we remember mexican writer carlos fuentes, whose prolific literary career spanned more than five decades. that's all
'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have the latest on this historic day, coming 15 months after the ouster of president hosni mubarak. >> ifill: then, we look at the facebook fallout as the social media giant's market debut falters out of the gate. >> brown: we have two on-the- ground reports on europe's economic troubles from spain and greece, where austerity measures are hitting home for ordinary citizens. >> ifill: we examine the iran nuclear talks in baghdad as world powers float a proposal to curb tehran's enrichment program. >> brown: and we close with the diamond anniversary of an american treasure. spencer michels has the story of building san francisco's golden gate bridge. >> it's not all celebration, a 75-year-old controversy has flared anew over who should get the credit for designing this spectacular bridge. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour haseeidn pry:pr bed b and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by
controlled schools for military dependants in the south before the brown decision, and everybody who thinks that eisenhower was anti-brown really haven't done their homework, and you mentioned about my book. my book is not an opinion piece. there's not a phrase in it that's not rooted in a document or in compelling circumstantial evidence. that doesn't mean there isn't argument that can be had about motivation, but there's some things facts that aren't hidden hand facts as the phrase has become, supreme court appointments. eisenhower refused to appoint judges to federal courts who were known segregationists, refused to do that. john f. kennedy when he came in appointed those right and left, and i have to say to you, folks, i have a son named for jfk, if you want to know where i come from, okay? and, you know, it's going -- i have fun handing in the program, but, you know, facts are facts, so eisenhower did a lot. he didn't do some things that people would have liked to have seen him do, but we'll get back to little rock, because i don't want to preempt ernie talking about that, but little r
say some chunking of the debris the size of cell phones. nobody was hurt. >>> chuck brown, godfather of go-go, being celebrated today at the howard theater. thousands of people stood in lines that stretched for blocks to say farewell to the d.c. pioneer. >> good evening. t street northwest in front of the howard theater you can see filled with people. the interesting thing is, people come to this viewing. they wait in line. they go inside for a few minutes to pay their respects and then they come out and they don't want to leave. they want to be part of the street party. a sendoff for singer chuck brown. ♪ >> reporter: chuck brown was a force whenever he performed despite his success, he remained grounded and will always be remembered as the d.c. native son. >> he loved washington. he represented this city to the fullest. the city loved him back as you can see. >> reporter: fans waited in a long line that stretch three blocks at one point to get into the howard athleter to pay their last respects. >> what do you think he would be thinking? >> he would want to be playing. >> if he d
, they are discovering who they are, what they want to do, i had already known that. >> suarez: and jeffrey brown interviews a filmmaker who chronicled one wounded marine's journey from the frontlines in afghanistan to civilian life in north carolina. >> i actually brought in a lot of my own personal experiences of going to war and coming home from it and what i realized was that the fighting doesn't end when these men come back, it just continues in a different way. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in a year, the bright minds from inside and outside the company come together to work on an idea. adding to it from the road, improving it in the cloud, all in real time. >> good idea. >> it's the at&t network. providing new ways to work together, so business works better. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and fi
woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on the attack in damascus. the deadliest in the 14 month uprising. >> woodruff: then, we assess the political fallout from president obama's coming out on same sex marriage. >> brown: miles o'brien reports on the move to curb scientific testing on chimpanzees to find cures for human ailments. >> so is it cruel or not? >> woodruff: margaret warner examines new warnings about the long term use of osteoporosis drugs aimed at rebuilding bones. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer robert caro about his latest volume on lyndon johnson, an epic story of history, politics and human rivalries. >> you hate to use words like hatred as a historian but hatred is not too strong a word to describe the relationship between robert kennedy and lyndon johnson. they hated each other. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> citi turns 200 this year. in that time, there have been some good days and some difficult ones. but through it al
brown. look forward to that. we're going to begin with that severe weather, including tropical storm beryl. really putting a damper on the holiday plans of millions of americans. the weather channel's mike seidel is in jacksonville beach, florida, this morning. mike, good morning to you. >> and good morning, savannah, from triple digit heat in parts of the midwest to the hottest may weather on record in that part of the country to the second tropical storm of the season, four days before the official start of the hurricane season, millions of americans are enduring some extreme weather this holiday weekend. with maximum sustained winds just below hurricane force, tropical storm beryl made landfall just after midnight near jacksonville, florida, where city officials canceled all outdoor memorial day events. >> everything is going to be shut down. we're really preparing for this tropical storm, and it's all about safety. we want people safe through this storm. >> reporter: from florida to south carolina, the tropical storm has whipped up the surf. creating dangerous rip currents. dozen
of james rupert murdoch, from that point of course there is no evidence the jury meeting with mr. brown. is that fair? you did say your list may not be complete in relation to mr. brown. >> i know my list is not complete. i am not sure. i'm sure tony blair had to release the formal and informal meetings and i'm pretty sure if they have, there will be meetings at downing street with mr. brown from that. in may, right up until september. i don't know how many there are. >> the topic of conversation on the third of may 2009 to remember any specific events. did it cover political issues? >> it was done in general terms. there were people at the lunch, but again late 2009, i'm not quite sure that my memory is correct, but i am pretty sure the european constitution debate what shall we say at large as well as afghanistan at the time. so they may have been two of the issues. >> we know on the ninth of september 2009, mr. james murdoch called mr. cameron is the drink of the george that "the sun" was support the conservative party in the next election and the headline was on the front page. i th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 189 (some duplicates have been removed)